One of my former colleagues blogged about using AutoFixture as an auto-mocking container the other day, which got me thinking about auto-mocking with Windsor.

Although I’ve never used auto-mocking myself, a few months ago, I answered a question on StackOverflow, hinting at how auto-mocking could be accomplished with Castle Windsor. I didn’t provide any example code though, so this post will show a more complete solution on how auto-mocking can be implemented with Windsor and Rhino Mocks[1. I realize that all the cool kids are using other mocking libraries these days. I’m still using Rhino though, but it should be a fairly trivial task to “port” this solution to another mocking library.].

A lazy component loader to generate the mocks

First, I create a simple ILazyComponentLoader that lazily registers a Rhino Mocks instance when a particular service is requested – like so:

– real simple. Windsor’s default lifestyle is singleton, which ensures that subsequent calls for the same service will give me the same mock instance.

Test fixture base class

Then I create a test fixture base class, which is supposed to act as exactly that: a fixture for the SUT:

As you can see, my SetUp method creates a new WindsorContainer, registering nothing but my AutoMockingLazyComponentLoader and TAppService – the SUT type. It then uses the container to instantiate the SUT, storing it away in a protected instance variable for test cases to work on.

I included DoSetUp and DoTearDown methods for my test fixtures to override in case they need to – but in most cases, they should not be used because of the coupling they introduce between test cases.

Lastly, I have two methods: Dep, which allows me to access an injected service type (short for “dependency”), and Mock which allows me to generate a new mock object in case I need to mock something other than my SUT’s dependencies.

How to write a new test fixture

As a result of this, a test fixture for something called HandleUpdateDisturbanceForecast is reduced to something like this:

– which I think looks pretty slick. And yes, this is an actual test case from something we’re building – doesn’t matter what it’s doing, just wanted to show an actual example.

It’s not like I’m saving a huge amount of coding here – I usually only instantiate my SUT in the SetUp method of my test fixtures, but I like how the “fixed style” of AutoMockingFixtureFor encourages application services to follow a pattern that makes for easy IoC and testing. And the fixture is relieved of almost all clutter that does not directly relate to the thing being tested.

Using Windsor as an auto-mocking container

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